Zero-G Vocaloid Demos

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LEON Demo: “Check It Out”.

Check It Out

(NOTE: All vocals on this demo are sung by Vocaloid LEON). A short piece that illustrates several of Vocaloid’s capabilities. The ease with which ‘ad libs’ can be created, the ability to create lyrics which are half sung, half spoken, and the way in which the voice can be made to sound like an expressive “vocalesque” instrument rather than a human, if so desired. Written, programmed and produced by Joe Hogan .

LOLA Demo: “Little Bird”.

Little Bird

(NOTE – the lead vocal line on this demo is NOT by Vocaloid – it is a real singer. Please listen to the backing vocals!). This demo illustrates well how LOLA has been used to create a simple backing vocal arrangement for a personally-produced song. The song was written and performed by Andy Power. Andy is singing the lead vocal himself, with his real voice, but he was able to add the backing vocals to his song purely by creating them all using LOLA. Although this is only a very simple example, it immediately illustrates LOLA’s usefulness in an everyday situation.

LEON+LOLA Demo: “Dupdah”.

Dupdah

(NOTE – All vocals on this demo are by either Vocaloid LOLA or Vocaloid LEON). A humorous piece featuring a kind of non-verbal “scatting”, featuring LOLA and LEON singing together. This one illustrates Vocaloid’s freedom! You can use any sounds a human could utter, and more! As you can see, rhythmically, harmonically, and melodically speaking, the sky’s the limit! Written, programmed and produced by Anders Sodergren.

LEON+LOLA Demo: “Falling”.

Falling

(NOTE – All vocals on this demo are by either Vocaloid LOLA or Vocaloid LEON). A short song featuring LOLA and LEON singing together. Lead vocal by LOLA. Written, programmed and produced by Anders Sodergren.

LEON+LOLA Demo: “Freaky Sheep”.

Freaky Sheep

(NOTE – All vocals on this demo are by either Vocaloid LOLA or Vocaloid LEON). An abstract avant garde piece of rhythmic vocal sculpture (or to put it another way, weird) that illustrates how easy it is to explore new sonic territory with Vocaloid. Written, programmed and produced by Joe Hogan. Who did Joe get to sing what? Basically its 50/50 between the two singers. The harmonised stereo delay arpeggio type thing at the start is LOLA on the left and LEON on the right. The offbeat “sha” that comes in is both singers, again panned left and right. The “sar” bassline is Lola (way below her natural range!). The “ah, ah, ah, ah, ah” 4-part block chords figure contains two of each singer. The really high pitched tune that comes in at 0:24s is LEON (way above his range!). The whispered “taka-taka” thing that can be heard clearly at 0:33s is LEON, and that kind of bassy pitched kick-drum type sound that happens at the same time is also LEON. Switching between singers during a sequence is easy with Vocaloid.

LOLA Demo: “Introducing Lola”.

Introducing Lola

(NOTE – ALL vocals on this demo were sung by Vocaloid LOLA). Features various lead lyric phrases and a good selection of expressive ad-libs. Written, programmed and produced by Anders Sodergren.

LOLA Demo: “Lola Is Here”.

Lola Is Here

(NOTE – Both the lead vocal and the backing vocals on this demo were sung by Vocaloid LOLA). Although there are few lyrics in this piece, it illustrates how easy it is to get LOLA to sing non-verbal ‘ad-libs’. Written, programmed and produced by Andy Power. (Backing track features rhythms from Spectrasonics ‘Stylus’).

LEON+LOLA Demo: “Forever”.

Forever

(NOTE – All vocals on this demo are by either Vocaloid LOLA or Vocaloid LEON). A powerfully atmospheric demo featuring LOLA and LEON singing together. Written, programmed and produced by Dom Keeffe.

LOLA Demo: “Without You”.

Without You

Another demo with a REAL SINGER on the lead vocal and Vocaloid LOLA providing all the backing vocals. This short laid back jazzy song was written by Andy Power. Andy synced up the Vocaloid software via ReWire to Cubase SX. This enabled him to work purely in the Vocaloid editor, as pressing ‘Play’ in Vocaloid also started Cubase in sync. This set-up also works from Cubase (as he was recording the second guitar track, Vocaloid was also playing along in time – flawlessly). Thanks to the ReWire connection, he was also able to send each voice (Vocaloid Track) to a different track within the Cubase mixer, enabling him to use separate EQ and effects etc on each individual channel. Whilst the (real) person singing the lead line won’t exactly win any prizes, the backing vocals (sung by a machine) are pretty convincing!

LOLA Demo: “Sweet Dreams”.

Sweet Dreams

(NOTE – Vocals sung by Vocaloid LOLA). This short song excerpt features an exposed lead vocal line. Written/programmed by Joe Hogan.

LOLA Demo: “Bach Vowels”.

Bach Vowels

(NOTE – all vocals on this demo are by Vocaloid LOLA). This demo was created from scratch in just 15 minutes and it illustrates well how quickly and easily LOLA can been used to create layered harmonies. The music is of course by Bach but this 21st century rendering was put together in a flash by Dom Keeffe. Again, although this is only a very basic example, it immediately illustrates Vocaloid’s usefulness and ease of use – even for creating choral harmonies. [Note that only a few different vowel sounds were used in this demo – it is clearly not intended to illustrate realism in terms of language. Note also that the lower harmonies are outside LOLA’s natural singing range]

Some earlier demos of the Yamaha technology in action (the demos which first appeared at the Frankfurt Music Messe in March 2003) can also be heard at the official Yamaha Vocaloid website, at www.vocaloid.com – for example here’s a great demo of one of the early Japanese vocal fonts created by Yamaha’s team.

kimi no uwasa

To watch a VOCALOID TUTORIAL VIDEO, which takes you through the basic steps in creating vocal lines with Vocaloid, click HERE

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